Replication data for Evaluation of movements with greater trunk acceleration and their properties during volleyball games

The present study aimed to elucidate the movements that require greater trunk acceleration and their frequency during volleyball matches and compare their acceleration components. A triaxial accelerometer was used to measure trunk acceleration during volleyball matches. The moments that generated resultant accelerations >4G, >5G and >6G were extracted, and movements that coincided with the extracted moments were identified. The ratios and frequencies of the extracted movements were calculated, and the resultant, mediolateral, vertical and anteroposterior accelerations among the top seven volleyball-specific extracted movements were compared. For attackers, 361, 185 and 97 movements were extracted with acceleration thresholds of 4G, 5G and 6G, respectively. At 6G, landing (77%) was the most frequently observed movement. For receivers, 297, 115 and 38 movements were extracted with acceleration thresholds of 4G, 5G and 6G, respectively. At 4G, running (49%) and steps (31%) were the most frequently observed movements. Resultant and vertical accelerations of spike landing were significantly greater than those of the other six movements (p < 0.001, respectively). Stationary or directional steps observed in receivers showed greater anteroposterior acceleration. Frequency or magnitude of trunk acceleration during these movements might determine the risk of injury during volleyball.